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  -Nicosia
  -Kyrenia
  -Famagusta
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Nicosia - North Cyprus
 
Nicosia Kyrenia Famagusta
     
Arab Ahmet Mosque:
This mosque was constructed on the foundations of a medieval church in 1845. There are said to be tombstones from the 14th century under its stone floor.
Atatürk Square and the Venetian Column:
Atatürk Square is an open area in the center of the old walled city and is surrounded by buildings of the British administration on the island. In the center of the square is a twenty-foot column originally erected by the Venetians upon which once stood the Lion of St. Mark. After the Ottoman conquest of Lefkosa, the column was removed only to be put back in its place by the British. The British, however, were unable to locate the Lion, and so replaced it with a copper globe.
Büyük Hamam (Big Turkish Bath):
The inn is thought to have been built by Muzaffer Pasha in 1572 and is typical of inns built in Anatolia around the same time. This example is a two story building around a courtyard in which can be found a small mosque and a foundation for absolutions. Open during working hours Monday to Friday. Closed at weekends and on public holidays.
Church of St. Nicolas:
The church was originally built in the Byzantine period (12th century) but was abbed to in Lusignan times. Interest in the building is derived from its mixture of styles. Open during working hours Monday to Friday. Closed at weekends and on public holidays.
Dervish Pasha's Mansion:
Dervish Pasha was the first editor of a Turkish Cypriot newspaper. His house, built in the mid 19th century, is typical of Turkish urban architecture.
Kyrenia Gate:
This is the enterance to the walled city from the Girne direction. The fortified walls were built by the Venetians to keep out the (eventually successful) Ottoman invaders. Today roads, built by the British, run through the gate.

Kumarcilar Ham (The Gamblers' Inn):
This inn is a simpler version of the Büyük Han but does not have a mosque in the courtyard. Open during working hours Monday to Friday. Closed at weekends and on public holidays.
Lapidary Museum:
In this old Venetian building, stones and other fragments from destroyed medieval buildings have been collected together to form this interesting muesum. Open during working hours from Monday to Friday, closed at weekends and public holidays.
The Bandabiilya (Covered Market):
Here you can find an interesting array of fresh food produce and other items. There are butchers, greengrocers, grocers and fishmongers. There are also stalls selling anything from olive oil to plastic toys. The market was opened by the British colonial administration in 1938. Open during working hours from Monday to Saturday, closed on Sundays and public holidays.
Selimiye Mosque (St. Sofia Cathedral):
This is an outstanding example of Gothic architecture officially consecrated in 1326 and contains all the hallmarks of the great French cathedrals of the time. In 1570, following the Ottoman conquest of city, it was converted into a mosque. Open during working hours from Monday to Friday, closed at weekends and public holidays.
Sultan Mahmoud II Library:
The library was founded in 1829 by Sultan Mahmoud the second. The building is big, square and has a large dome on top, and inside can be found rare Turkish, Arabic and Persian texts. Open during working hours from Monday to Saturday, closed on Sundays and public holidays.